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Policy Manual

Category: Administrative

POLICY


Title: PHILOSOPHY AND GOALS

Effective: June 1, 2005

Revised: June 2015

MISSION STATEMENT

The mission of the Shirley M. Wright Memorial Library is to provide quality materials and services which fulfill educational, informational, cultural and recreational needs of the entire community in an atmosphere that is welcoming, respectful and businesslike.

LIBRARY BILL OF RIGHTS

The Shirley M. Wright Memorial Library Board of Trustees hereby adopts the following policy of the American Library Association.

The American Library Association affirms that all libraries are forums for information and ideas, and that the following basic policies should guide their services.

1 Books and other library resources should be provided for the interest, information and enlightenment of all people of the community the library serves. Materials should not be excluded because of the origin, background, or views of those contributing to their creation.

2 Libraries should provide materials and information presenting all points of view on current and historical issues. Materials should not be proscribed or removed because of partisan or doctrinal disapproval.

3 Libraries should challenge censorship in the fulfillment of their responsibility to provide information and enlightenment.

4 Libraries should cooperate with all persons and groups concerned with resisting abridgment of free expression and free access to ideas.

5 A person’s right to use a library should not be denied or abridged because of origin, age, background or views.

6 Libraries which make exhibit spaces and meeting rooms available to the public they serve should make such facilities available on an equitable basis, regardless of the beliefs or affiliations of individuals or groups requesting their use.

Adopted June 18, 1948 by the American Library Association (ALA)

Amended February 2, 1961 and January 23,1980

Inclusion of “age” reaffirmed January 23, 1996 by the ALA Council

LIBRARY GOALS

The goals of the Shirley M. Wright Memorial Library shall be:

1 To serve all residents of the community and surrounding townships.

2 To acquire and make available to all residents of the service area such books, periodicals, pamphlets and other services that will satisfy their need to become well-informed, to decide important questions, to discipline the emotions, to cultivate the imagination, to refine tastes and to enjoy leisure by means of reading and other media services.

3 To have resources to provide the most frequently requested material from its collection.

4 To provide programming for all ages which educates, inspires, entertains, and fosters a sense of community among area residents.

5 To consistently maintain an open-minded attitude toward new methods and improvements for better service and to avoid a static condition of satisfaction with things as they are.

6 To review regularly these objectives of the Shirley M. Wright Memorial Library and, if necessary, revise them in the light of new developments.

DEALING WITH CHALLENGES TO LIBRARY POLICIES

The Director makes the important first step since the Board has delegated to the Director the responsibility for implementing all policies. The Director explains that there is a policy for handling objections and that the patron has the right to use that process.

Whether the patron’s concern is communicated through a trustee to the Director or is made directly to the Director, the objection may become a formal challenge if it cannot be resolved through informal dialog between the Director and the patron. (See Appendix E)

The Director then informs the Board of the formal appeal and provides all necessary information to help the Board in its deliberations at an open board meeting.

Category: Administrative

POLICY


Title: Library Board of Trustees

Effective: June 1, 2005

Revised: June 2015

RESPONSIBILITIES AND AUTHORITY OF THE LIBRARY BOARD

The following list of Board responsibilities and authorities is based on Wisconsin Statutes. Citations for the particular section of the statutes are provided in brackets.

1 Setting Library Policies: The Board is charged with specifying conditions for library usage which will allow the most beneficial use to the greatest number. This can include policies which exclude those who do not follow library policies. [43.52(2)]

2 Establishing Offices and Holding Elections: The Board is to specify which offices will be created and is to hold annual elections for those offices. The president is the only mandated office. [43.54 (2)]

3 Controlling Expenditures and Assets: The Board is to have exclusive control of expenditures of all moneys collected, donated, or appropriated for the library. This includes control of and custody of lands, buildings and other properties bequeathed, given, granted or otherwise acquired by the municipality for the library. [43.58 (1)]

4 Approving Vouchers: The Board has the responsibility of approving all vouchers for payment and of forwarding those vouchers with authorization for payment to the municipal financial officer. [43.58 (2)]

The Division for Libraries and Community Learning recognizes that there are logistical realities regarding voucher approval and prompt payment. David Polodna, compliance officer for the Winding Rivers Library System, suggests in a letter dated February 4, 1998 “the board…establish an executive committee…to approve bills in the interim…between full board meetings…contingent upon all bills ultimately being brought before the full board for approval.”

5 Appointing and Supervising Staff: The Board has the responsibility and authority to appoint and supervise the library Director and to prescribe duties and compensation for library employees. The selected Director is to be given the charge of appointing other staff as deemed necessary by the Board. [43.58 (4)]

6 Providing Programming: The Board has the authority to employ individuals or cooperate with other agencies to provide programs which promote library use and educational endeavors. [43.58 (5)]

7 Submitting Reports: The Board must submit an annual report to the State which specifies financial conditions for the year and data on library materials, facilities, personnel, operations and other information requested by the State. [43.58 (6)]

8 Managing Gifts: The Board has authority to receive, manage and dispose of any gifts or donations given for library purposes. [43.58 (7)]

9 Extending Use: The Board has the authority to extend the use of its facilities and materials to individuals not resident in the municipality, to exchange materials with other libraries and to make arrangements (contracts) with libraries of other counties to share, use or lend materials. [43.60 (1) & (2)]

The foregoing nine items were issued by the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction – Division of Libraries and Community Learning on December 11, 1990

10 Library Board Composition:

Village library boards are composed of five (5) members, although two (2) additional members may be appointed so that the Board has seven (7) members.

Members of the library board must be residents of the Village, except that not more than two (2) members may be residents of other municipalities, i.e. Townships of Trempealeau and Caledonia. [43.54 (1)(a)]

One member of the library board must be a school district administrator or his/her designated representative. The Village Board trustee appointed to the library board serves a three (3) year term. No more than one member of the Village Board may serve on the library board at any one time. [43.54 (1)(c)]

11 Library Board Appointments

Candidates requesting consideration for appointment will submit a letter to the Village President and copied to the Library Board President. The Library Board shall recommend appointments / renewals to the Village Board.

Each library board appointment must be formally renewed or replaced every three years. Appointments are made by the Village President, with the approval of the Village Board of Trustees. [43.54 (1) (b)]

Vacancies may be filled for an unexpired term by filling the remaining portion of the term. When that partial term is completed, the Village President may then re-appoint that person for a subsequent full term.

BY-LAWS OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES

1 OFFICERS

The officers of the Board may consist of President, Secretary and Treasurer. Their terms of office shall be for one year. Officers shall be elected annually and hold office until their successors are elected and installed.

2 MEETINGS

Regular meetings shall be held monthly; date, time and place to be determined by the Board.

3 COMMITTEES

a) Special committees for the study and investigation of special problems may be appointed by the President; such committees will serve until the completion of the work for which they were appointed.

b) The executive committee is composed of the officers of the Board and serves for one year to deal with emergency situations. Any member of that committee may serve to approve vouchers in a timely fashion. The executive committee is subject to the open meetings law.

4 QUORUM

A quorum shall consist of four (4) or more Board members.

5 ORDER OF BUSINESS

a) Standard parliamentary procedure will be followed at Board meetings.

b) Agenda may be developed as follows:

Call meeting to order

Roll Call of Members

Approval of Agenda

Approval of Minutes

Open Forum

Approval of Treasurer’s Report

Approval of Vouchers

Library Director’s Report

Unfinished Business

New Business

Set Meeting Dates and Times

Adjournment

6 AMENDMENTS TO BY-LAWS

These by-laws may be amended at any regular meeting of the Board with

a quorum present by a majority vote. The amendment must be stated in

the call for the meeting.

Category: Services

POLICY


Title: PUBLIC SERVICES

Effective: June 1, 2005

Revised: June 2015

SERVICES OF THE LIBRARY

The library provides books and materials for information, entertainment, intellectual development and enrichment of the general public.

The library shall endeavor to:

1 Select, organize and make available necessary books and materials to fulfill the needs of the public it serves.

2 Provide guidance and assistance to patrons.

3 Initiate programs, exhibits, displays, book lists, etc.

4 Cooperate with other community organizations.

5 Secure information beyond its own resources when requested

6 Lend to other libraries upon request

7 Provide services to patrons with special needs

8 Maintain a balance in its services to all age groups

9 Cooperate with school and other institutional libraries

10 Provide service during hours which best meet the needs of the community

11 Regularly review library services being offered

12 Use media to promote new books, periodicals, non-print materials and services available to the public.

RESIDENCY REQUIREMENTS

The library serves all permanent residents of the State of Wisconsin. The library will issue a library card to temporary residents of the State of Wisconsin.

Temporary residents are persons whose permanent residence is outside the State of Wisconsin and who will be residing in Wisconsin for less than six (6) months.

USE OF LIBRARY FACILITIES AND SERVICES

1 All persons may use the library facilities without holding a library card

2 A library card is required to check out library materials.

3 Service will not be denied or abridged because of race, color, national or ethnic origin, age, religion, disability, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity and expression, social, economic or political status, or any other characteristic protected under applicable federal or state law.

4 The use of the library may be denied for due cause. Such cause may be failure to return library materials; failure to pay penalties; destruction of library property; disturbance of other library patrons or any other objectionable conduct on library premises.

Patron Responsibility and Conduct Policy

All patrons must display proper behavior in order to protect their individual rights and privileges and those of other patrons. If a patron creates a public nuisance, that person may be restricted from using library facilities. Library staff has the authority to use personal discretion when dealing with disruptive patrons.

Children of all ages are encouraged to use the library for homework, pleasure reading, and program attendance. All children under age six (6) must be accompanied by a parent or responsible person, who will remain in the library throughout the visit. Library staff realizes that the library will be noisier at busy times and that children by nature can cause more commotion, but any child, whether with parents or not, who is continually disruptive will be dealt with firmly.

Step Policy for Disruptive Behavior:

First incident: Patron will receive a verbal warning.
Second incident: Patron will receive another verbal warning.
Third Incident: Patron will be given a copy of the library’s “Patron Responsibilities and Conduct” policy and expelled from library facilities for the rest of the day. Library staff will complete an Incident Report (Appendix “F”).
In the case of recurring incidents involving the same patron, library staff may expel the patron from library facilities until he or she appears before the Library Board for a conduct hearing.
The patron will be given a completed Notice of Expulsion form (Appendix “G”) indicating the next scheduled Library Board meeting.
*Patrons who do not leave library facilities within a reasonable amount of time will be escorted from the building by police.

Food and beverages are not allowed in the main library. Food and beverages are allowed in the community room and at the tables in the lobby. Food and beverages may be served in the library during special library-sponsored events and only after hours.

Smoking and use of tobacco products is not allowed in the library or on the library grounds.

Cell phones may only be used in the community room or study rooms.

PROGRAMS

A library-initiated program is a planned interaction between library staff and the program participants for the purpose of promoting library material, facilities or services, as well as offering the community an informational, entertaining or cultural experience.

Library-initiated programs include such activities as story times, films and activities on non-school days, and summer reading program for children and young adults. The library may also co-sponsor programs with community groups.

Meeting rooms for public use are available for programs not initiated or sponsored by the library. Article VI of the Library Bill of Rights states:

Libraries which make exhibit spaces and meeting rooms available to the public they serve should make such facilities available on an equitable basis, regardless of the beliefs or affiliations of individuals or groups requesting their use.

Use of the meeting rooms does not constitute endorsement of the views of the user of the room by the library.

DEALING WITH CHALLENGES TO LIBRARY PROGRAMS

The Director makes the important first step since the Board has delegated to the Director the responsibility for approving all programs; both library-initiated and non-initiated library programs. The Director explains that there is a policy for handling objections and that the patron has the right to use that process.

Whether the patron’s concern is communicated through a trustee to the Director or it is made directly to the Director, the objection may become a formal challenge if it cannot be resolved through informal dialog between the Director and the patron. (See Appendix E)

The Director then informs the Board of the formal appeal and provides all necessary information to help the Board in its deliberations at an open board meeting.

DISPLAYS AND EXHIBITS

As an educational and cultural institution, the Shirley M. Wright Memorial Library welcomes exhibits and displays of interest, information and enlightenment to the community. Display of handiwork, art, historical material, nature study or any other material deemed of general interest may be exhibited. The Director shall accept or reject material offered for display in accordance to suitability and availability.

The library assumes no responsibility for the preservation, protection, or possible damage or theft of any item displayed or exhibited. All items placed in the library are done so at the owner’s risk. The owner must read and sign the Shirley M. Wright Memorial Library Display and Exhibit Release form. (See Appendix C)

The glass display case in the lobby is available to the public for displays and exhibits.

REFERENCE SERVICE POLICY

The library staff will:

1 Provide information in the form of short answers to specific questions and guidance.

2 Assist in locating material for patrons who appear in person, call on the telephone or request information through correspondence.

3 Assist patrons in the use of the library and teach research methodology, when appropriate. This includes providing help in developing a research strategy and advice on whether a trip to the library would be worthwhile for individuals who telephone.

4 Provide bibliographic verification of items both in the library and not owned by the library and will assist patrons in obtaining materials through interlibrary loan, when appropriate.

5 Refer library users to other agencies and libraries in pursuit of needed information

6 Use not only the library’s resources in printed form, but consult resource libraries, the Internet and local agencies by telephone in pursuit of “ready reference” information.

INTERNET USE POLICY

Purpose:

Research and reference are the main purposes of the library’s Internet access.

Libraries and librarians have a responsibility to provide material and information presenting all points of view. Libraries must support access to materials to meet user’s needs.

The library provides access to the Internet to enhance the information and learning opportunities for the citizens of the library’s service area. The Internet Use policy is established to ensure appropriate and effective use of the resource.

Disclaimers

Just as libraries do not vouch for or endorse the viewpoints of written material in their collection, they do not vouch for or endorse electronic information. Selection policies which serve to govern a library’s purchase of written materials may not apply to material accessed electronically. It is the responsibility of the user to determine what is appropriate.

The Internet is a decentralized, unmoderated global network. The Shirley M. Wright Memorial Library has no control over the content found therein. The library will not censor access to material nor protect users from offensive information. It is not responsible for the availability and accuracy of information found on the Internet.

The Library cannot assure that data or files downloaded by users are virus-free. The library is not responsible for damages to equipment or data on a user’s personal computer from the use of data downloaded from the library’s Internet service.

The use of the Internet and email is not guaranteed to be private. Messages relating to or in support of illegal activities will be reported to the proper authorities

PUBLIC ACCESS GUIDELINES

1 Access to the Internet is available to all patrons; however, this service may be restricted at any time for use not consistent with guidelines.

2 Internet users must register with a staff member.

3 Internet access is a privilege, not a right, which may be revoked at any time for inappropriate conduct.

4 Parents of minor children must assume responsibility for their children’s use of the Internet through the library’s connection.

5 Use of the Internet workstation is limited to thirty (30) minutes at one time, longer if no one is waiting on a first come, first serve basis. If all the computers are busy and another user signs up, you may be asked to end your time on the computer if you have been signed in for over 30 minutes.

CODE OF CONDUCT

1 Staff members may provide minimal assistance as time permits. Library staff will assist patrons in navigating the Internet to the best of their abilities. Library staff will not, however, help patrons locate personal information about an individual such as address, phone number, etc.

2 Users may not attempt to modify, alter or damage software and equipment.

3 Users may not use their own software programs on the Internet workstations.

4 Downloading software from the Internet is prohibited.

5 Users will not send, receive or display text/graphics which may reasonably be construed as obscene.

6 Users may not send/receive email on the library’s account.

7 Chat rooms are not allowed unless approved by library staff.

PUBLIC USE OF EQUIPMENT AND MACHINES

Copy Machine

1 The public may request photocopies. The library suggests a donation of $0.15 per page. The copy machine may be used by the staff and library board members for library business.

2 Patrons requesting copies are advised that there are restrictions on copyrighted materials. Patrons will assume responsibility and liability for copyright infringement.

Fax Machine

1 The public may request the transmission of a fax. The library suggests a donation of $1.50 for the service and $.50 per printed page transmitted by fax.

2 The fax machine may be used by library board members and staff for business reasons. There is no fee to administration or staff.

Scanner

1 Staff will scan documents to patron’s email upon request. There is no charge for this service.

Laminating

1 Staff will laminate items no larger than 8.5×11 in. for a suggested donation of $.50/page.

Disc Clean & Buff

1 Staff will clean patrons’ discs upon request for a suggested donation of $.50/disc.

INTERLIBRARY LOAN (ILL)

Because of limited budget and space, the library cannot provide all materials that are requested. Therefore, interlibrary loan is used to obtain from other libraries those materials that are beyond the scope of this library’s collection.

As a member of the Winding Rivers Library System (WRLS) and a participating member in the shared information technology network (WRLSWEB), the library can request materials from other libraries and lend its materials to other libraries through the same interlibrary loan network.

RESERVES

Reserves may be requested by patrons either in person, over the phone, through the electronic card catalog or through the Internet at www.wrlsweb.org/trempealeau .

Patrons will be notified by telephone, email, or text when materials are available.

Patrons are not charged for placing requests or for interlibrary loan services.

LOST AND FOUND POLICY

Items left at the library will be discarded after fourteen (14) days.

Title: Circulation of Materials

Effective: June 1, 2005

Revised: June 2015, January 2018, June 2018

REGISTRATION

1 All borrowers must be registered and must have a Winding Rivers Library System (WRLS) library card to borrow library materials.

2 Patrons must fill out a registration form to apply for a new library card. The following statement will be printed on the registration form for the patron’s information and acceptance.

I agree to be responsible for all items borrowed with the library card issued in the above name, including items borrowed with it by others with or without my consent unless I have previously reported the loss of my card. I promise to comply with all library rules and policies both present and future, and to give prompt notice of change of address or loss of library card.

Signature————————

3 An adult must complete and sign an application and present:

A current valid ID with photo, name, and current address. (Driver’s license, Wisconsin state ID, etc.)
OR

An ID with photo and name and another piece of current identification which must include name and current address. Acceptable forms of ID are: a personal check; current telephone, gas, electric, or cable bill; or lease agreement. (Post office box numbers are not acceptable.)
Anyone without a fixed address may use a letter certifying their local residency from the social service agency where he or she receives mail.

4 Persons applying for a library card may check out items the day the library card is issued.

5 Children under eighteen (18) years of age must present a completed and signed application that includes the signature of a parent, stepparent, foster parent, legal guardian, or other responsible adult. This guardian/responsible adult must also present identification as described above and must be willing to accept full responsibility for fines and charges on the child’s account.

LOST OR FORGOTTEN CARDS

Patrons are encouraged to bring their library card to the library if they wish to check out materials. If patrons forget their card, they may still check out materials if the staff member knows them or they have some form of identification.

LOAN PERIODS

1 Books and Audiobooks

a) Three (3) week loan for books and audio books

b) Books and audiobooks may be renewed up to three times unless requested by another patron

2 Periodicals

a) Current issues of monthly and weekly periodicals are available for loan.

b) One (1) week loan for eligible periodicals.

c) Periodicals may be renewed up to three times unless requested by another patron.

3 DVDs

a) One (1) week loan for videos and DVDs.

b) Videos and DVDs may be renewed up to three times unless requested by another patron.

4 Music CDs

a) Three (3) week loan for music CDs.

b) Music CDs may be renewed up to three times unless item is requested by another patron.

5 Reference Books

a) Reference books do not circulate.

6 Interlibrary Loans (ILL)

a) Interlibrary loans are due the date indicated on the Shirley M. Wright Memorial Library checkout receipt.

b) Interlibrary loans may be renewed if permitted by the lending library.

OVERDUE FINES

As of June 2018, overdue fines are no longer charged on all items in our collection, except for items in the More Than Books and Lucky Day collections.

  1. Notification Procedure for Overdue Materials

a) A first notice is sent approximately one (1) week after the material is due.

b) A second notice is sent approximately two (2) weeks after the material is due.

c) A third notice and replacement cost bill are sent approximately three (3) weeks after the material is due. No overdue fines are assessed, and the account will be blocked if the fine balance is over $10.00. After 1 year, the item will be removed from the database and longer able to be returned.

d) If the material is not returned the matter may be turned over to the Village of Trempealeau Police Department for action.

LOSS / DAMAGE ASSESSMENTS

Materials that have been lost or damaged to the point of replacement will be charged according to the following rationale

a) Actual replacement cost of the material.

b) If actual replacement cost cannot be determined the following schedule will apply:

– Adult hardcover/Audio $20.00

– Adult paperback $10.00

– Periodicals $ 5.00

– Children’s Books $20.00

– Videos and DVDs $25.00

The Library will not accept replacement materials purchased by the patron. Replacement of damaged materials beyond repair or lost items will be made by the Director. Director may adjust replacement cost of material due to age, condition, and change in value at her discretion.

PERSONAL PRIVACY AND CONFIDENTIALITY

All records, formal and informal in the Shirley M. Wright Memorial Library relating to patron registration and the subsequent circulation by patrons of materials provided by the library are considered to be confidential in nature. Therefore, only authorized staff may be stationed at the circulation desk computers. In order to prevent an unreasonable invasion of personal privacy, the contents of registration and circulation records shall not be made available to anyone:

a) except under the written order of the Director, such order having been issued pursuant to a proper legal process, order or subpoena under the law.

b) except to persons acting within the scope of their duties in the administration of the library or library system. (WI Statutes Section 43.30)

c) except persons authorized by the individual to inspect such records. (WI Statutes Section 43.31)

d) except by order of a court of law. (WI Statutes Section 43.30)

Upon receipt of any process, order or subpoena the person named and/or served shall immediately report to and consult with the Director and the legal counsel of the Village of Trempealeau to determine if such process, order or subpoena is proper and in full compliance with proper legal authority. In the event the legal process fails to sufficiently identify or name in specific terms or specifications the records on file in respect to an identified library patron, the request is considered to be defective and not binding upon the library and its personnel, except under further due process of law.

Any problems or conditions relating to the privacy of a patron through the records of the Shirley M. Wright Memorial Library which are not specified in the policy statement shall be referred to the Director, who after study and consultation with the Board and/or legal counsel, shall issue a written decision as to whether to heed the request for information.

Category: Collection Development

POLICY

Title: Materials Selection

Effective: June 1, 2005

Revised: October 2008, June 2015

OBJECTIVES

1 The purpose of the Shirley M. Wright Memorial Library is to provide everyone with carefully selected books and other materials to aid individuals in the pursuit of education, information, research, and recreation.

2 Because of the volume of publishing, as well as the limitations of budget and space, the library must have a selection policy with which to meet community interests and needs.

3 The Materials Selection Policy is used by the Director in the selection of materials and also serves to acquaint the general public with the principles of selection.

4 Both the “Library Bill of Rights” and “The Freedom to Read” statements have been endorsed by the Shirley M. Wright Memorial Library Board. Both statements are integral parts of the Materials Selection Policy.

(See Appendix A and B)

RESPONSIBILITY FOR SELECTION

The ultimate responsibility for selection of library materials rests with the Director who operates within the framework of the policies approved by the Board. This responsibility may be shared with staff. The Director answers to the Board and the general public for the selections made. Therefore, the Director has the authority to accept or reject any item recommended by staff.

CRITERIA FOR SELECTION OF PRINTED MATERIALS

The criteria for the selection of printed materials are:

1 existing subject matter in the collection

2 suitability of material to the community

3 timeliness and permanent value

4 budget

5 popular appeal/demand

6 reliability of information

7 integrity of author and publisher

8 availability elsewhere in the community

CRITERIA FOR SELECTION OF NON-PRINT MATERIALS

The criteria for the selection of non-print materials are:

1 content to be valid, true to fact, or true to text, if in writing

2 timely subject matter or be of timeless social/cultural value

3 popular interest

4 consideration of whether or not the subject matter is best presented in a visual / audio format.

CRITERIA FOR SELECTION OF FEATURE FILMS

The criteria for selection of feature films on videocassettes and DVDs are:

1 emphasis on quality and variety for older films

2 emphasis on popularity and quality for more recent films.

SOURCES OF INFORMATION ON LIBRARY MATERIALS

Reviews are the major source of information about materials.

The lack of a review or an unfavorable review shall not be the sole reason for rejecting a title which is in demand. Consideration is, therefore, given to patrons’ requests and materials discussed in the media. Materials are judged on the basis of the work as a whole, not on a part taken out of context.

Category: Collection Development

POLICY


Title: CHALLENGED MATERIALS

Effective: June 1, 2005

Revised: October 2008, June 2015


The Shirley M. Wright Memorial Library recognizes that some materials are controversial and that any given item may offend some patrons. Selection of materials will not be made on the basis of anticipated approval or disapproval, but solely on the basis of the principles stated in the Materials Selection policy.

Parents or legal guardians are responsible for choosing their children’s library materials. Selection of library materials will not be inhibited by the possibility that materials may come into the hands of children.

Library materials will not be marked or identified to show approval or disapproval of the content and no library material will be sequestered except to protect it from injury or theft.

CHALLENGED MATERIALS

Although materials are carefully selected, differences of opinion may arise regarding suitable materials. Patrons requesting that material be withdrawn from or restricted within the collection may complete a form entitled “Statement of Concern about Library Resources”. (See Appendix D)

Upon receipt of the form the Director will place the statement on the agenda of the next regularly scheduled meeting of the Shirley M. Wright Memorial Library Board and notify the patron of the date, time, and place of the meeting.

The Board will be immediately notified and given as much information as possible in a timely manner to prepare for the above meeting, e.g. copies of reviews, copy of “Statement of Concern about Library Resources”, copy of the challenged material.

POLICY

Title: Gifts and Donations

Effective: June 1, 2005

Revised: October 2008, June 2015, May 2019

Gifts of Materials:

While we appreciate the generosity and thoughtfulness of donors, the library is unable to accept all donations due to space restrictions. The Director and staff may accept donations for the library collection or the Friends of the Trempealeau Library book sales. Materials donated to the library become the property of the library. Any unsold items will be donated to other institutions, and when necessary, discarded. Those giving the donations are responsible for bringing the items into the building for review and taking back any that are refused. The library will not appraise the value of donated materials, though it can provide an acknowledgment of receipt of the items if requested by the donor.

Author and publisher donations will be vetted by the Library Director.

Memorial Gifts:

Monetary donations in memory or honor of someone are appreciated. Specific memorial books will be ordered for the collection by request of a patron as long as they meet the criteria of the materials selection policy. Book selection will be made by the Director if no specific book is requested.

Acknowledgements will be sent to the donor and to the family of the honoree. Items purchased with these donations will contain a bookplate with the donor’s and honoree’s names.

Other Monetary Gifts:

Monetary gifts are accepted and used to enhance the Library services or the collection. A donor’s specific request for use of the monetary donation will be honored if practically possible but cannot be guaranteed. Undesignated gifts over $500 will be deposited in the Library Gift Fund, under the control of the Library Board of Trustees.

Donations of Decorative or Display Objects

No gift will be accepted by the Library unless it is freely given to the extent that the Library may:

  1. Dispose of the gift as it sees fit.
  2. Store or move the gift.

The following points must be considered by the Library staff and trustees before accepting a gift of this kind:

  1. Does it conform to the general architecture of the building?
  2. Will it fit comfortably into the space provided?

  3. Is the object appropriate to the Library objectives?

  4. What is the cost in accepting the gift, including cost of insurance, restoration, display, maintenance, storage?

  5. Is it generally acceptable to the Board?

POLICY

Title: Discarding and Replacement of Library Property

Effective: June 1, 2005

Revised: June 2015, January 2018

A Collection

An up-to-date, attractive and useful collection is maintained through a continual discarding and replacing process. The Shirley M. Wright Memorial Library continually withdraws items from the collection. The entire collection will be assessed for withdrawals on a schedule determined by the Director.

Assessment of the collection should be based on the following criteria:

1 usage

2 age

3 value

4 quality

5 deterioration

Replacement of deteriorated or worn volumes is dependent upon current demand, usefulness, more recent acquisitions and availability of newer editions.

The following items may be retained in the collection and are not subject to the above criteria:

1 works of local authors

2 works related to local history

3 works of famous authors including “classics”

4 works that are unique to the collection in that there is little information available on the topic elsewhere

Withdrawn books are donated to the Friends of the Shirley M. Wright Memorial Library for book sales. The proceeds from such sales are used for the benefit of the library. Books that are not sold will be disposed of at the discretion of the Friends of the Library.

B Other Items

It is recommended that whenever any furnishings, equipment, and/or supplies have been declared obsolete by the Director, he/she shall cause such items to be disposed of or sold.

The Director reserves the right to dispose of items with no resale value, as well as any items that do not sell.

All monies received from the sale of these items will be deposited in the General Fund.

Category: Facilities

POLICY

Title: Community Room

Effective: June 1, 2005

Revised: July 2009, July 2015

The Trempealeau Lions Community Room in the Shirley M. Wright Memorial Library is used for library and library-related activities and programs to promote the use of the library, educate the public and promote reading. The community room can also be used by commercial, for-profit organizations, and private social events in accordance with the terms outlined in our Community Room Policy.

All requests for use of the community room shall be approved by the Director or staff.

The library is not responsible for any equipment, supplies, materials, clothing or other items brought to the library by any group or individual attending a meeting.

The Board and staff do not assume any liability for groups or individuals attending a meeting in the library.

Food or beverages are not allowed in the main library. Food and beverages may be served in the community room and served at the tables in the lobby. Food and beverage may be served in the library during a special library-sponsored events.

Smoking is not allowed in the library or on the library grounds.

Regular use by community groups is allowed.

Programs not initiated by the library are to be conducted during open library hours or at the discretion of the Library Director only. A $20 fee may be assessed.

Library-initiated programs may be held during closed hours at the discretion of the Director.

Category: Facilities

POLICY

Title: Study Rooms

Effective: June 1, 2005

Revised: October 2008, July 2015

The Bagley Study Room and the Gerald B. Dettinger Study Room are to be used exclusively for private study or small group work. If too many people will be working together, they may be referred to the community room.

Staff will monitor activities in the study rooms and will check study rooms before leaving for the evening to ensure that no one will be locked in the library overnight.

Category: Facilities

POLICY

Title: Official Notices, Brochures, Postings

Effective: June 1, 2005

Revised: October 2008, July 2015

PUBLIC NOTICE BULLETIN BOARDS

The bulletin boards in the vestibule of the library will be used for library information, official notices of the Village of Trempealeau and the G-E-T school district and Trempealeau area community events.

All notices are to be presented to the circulation desk for posting and must be approved by the Director.

LITERATURE RACKS

Literature racks are intended to store pamphlets, brochures, and flyers of interest to the general public. These materials may include such items as tax forms, job notices, applications, informational handouts, government publications. All literature and notices are to be presented to the circulation desk for posting and must be approved by the Director.

POLITICAL LITERATURE

The Shirley M. Wright Memorial Library facility will not be used for the signing of petitions or the distribution of political literature. The facility shall not be used to support a political campaign on behalf of, or against any candidate for public office; including the distribution of written statements.

Category: Facilities

POLICY

Title: Emergency Management

Effective: August 2005

Revised: May 2006, July 2015, June 2018

FIRE EMERGENCIES

Call 911 immediately or press the panic button. Clear the building at the first whiff of smoke. Then check and see if the fire is small enough and contained enough to use the fire extinguisher. The time to think about fires is before they happen. Staff training in the use of the fire extinguisher is mandatory.

HEALTH EMERGENCIES

Call 911 immediately or press the panic button. Staff and bystanders should exercise caution when administering to the sick or injured person. Staff and bystanders can provide care to the best of their knowledge and ability. The sick or injured person should be made comfortable and protected from needless disturbance until medical help arrives. No medication, including aspirin, should ever be dispensed to the public.

SNOW STORMS

The library is a service institution serving the community–at–large. This basic philosophy guides the decision to close the library early or not open the library at all. Closing the library will be at the discretion of the Director. Public service announcements can be made on the radio or television if possible.

TORNADOS

When a tornado has been sighted in the vicinity or when radar spotters indicate one is approaching this area, the civil defense siren will sound. All persons should move to the bathroom hallway as soon as possible. Staff cannot restrain people in the building during a tornado warning. Staff will strongly advise that they remain in the bathroom hallway, but if they wish to leave, they may do so at their own risk. However, there are only two choices: remain in the bathroom hallway or leave the building.

BOMB THREATS

Do not panic. Keep the caller on the line as long as possible.

Press the panic button.

Ask the caller to repeat the message and try to write down every word spoken by the person.

If the caller does not indicate the location of the bomb or the time of possible detonation, ASK FOR THIS INFORMATION.

Pay particular attention to peculiar background noises such as motors running, background music and any other noises which may indicate where the call is originating from

Listen closely to the voice, (male. female) voice quality (calm, excited) accents and speech impediments.

Immediately after the caller hangs up, clear the building. The police will handle the actual bomb search.

VIOLENT INTRUDER

Your response to a violent person, to someone brandishing a weapon, or to an active shooter, will depend upon circumstances at the time. Remain calm and use the following information to assist you in determining how to respond when faced with an imminently violent person. The following recommendations are simple and easy to recall during a crisis. Improvisation is critical when dealing with dynamic and dangerous circumstances. Remember: always do whatever is necessary to survive.

Order of Response:

• Press panic button.

• Escape if you can. Run away from the incident if possible and try to call 911 when you are safe. Staff should meet at River Stop upon escaping.

• If you cannot escape, then Hide if you can do so safely. Get to a place where you will not be visible, preferably where you will have protection from the firing of a weapon. Call 911 only if you will not reveal your position.

• If you cannot run or hide safely, then you should Fight with everything you have until you have an opening to escape, help arrives, or your attacker is defeated.

• Notify the police as soon as it is safe to do so and provide the dispatcher with as much information and detail as you can. If you are in a group, only one of you should call 911.

• Once you are safe, remain where you are until you receive the “All Clear” from a trusted source, preferably the police or an emergency service provider.

Category: Library Advocacy

POLICY

Title: Public Relations

Effective: June 1, 2005

Revised: July 2015

Public relations goals of the Shirley M. Wright Memorial Library are:

1 to promote a good understanding of the library’s objectives and services to governing officials, civic leaders and the general public

2 To promote active participation in the varied services offered by the library to people of all ages.

Effective library advocacy and public relations require a coordinated effort by the Director, the staff, the Board, the Friends of the Library, other volunteers, and library users.

The effectiveness of the library and the way the library is viewed by the community are significantly influenced by the way people advocate and promote the library in the service area.

The Director will be expected to make presentations and to participate in community activities to promote library services. A reasonable amount of library time will be allowed for preparation and presentations. Material to be used by the media will be approved by the director.

Category: Library Advocacy

POLICY

Title: Friends of the Library

Effective: June 1, 2005

Revised: July 2015, March 2019

The Friends of the Shirley M. Wright Memorial Library is an association of people who unite to plan and execute programs and events to benefit the library, in conjunction with library goals and the needs of the Director.

The Friends group is a public relations unit and acts as ambassadors to encourage a positive relationship between the community and the library. The Friends group is involved in promoting awareness of the library and in fund-raising to support library needs.

The Friends group works in cooperation with the Board, which is the only body with legal authority to set policy for the development of the library. The Friends group keeps the Board abreast of its activities on a regular basis.

Category: Staff & Volunteers

POLICY

Title: Personnel Policies

Effective: June 1, 2005

Revised: October 2008, July 2015, March 2019

The Shirley M. Wright Memorial Library Board of Trustees has adopted the Village of Trempealeau Personnel Policy/Procedure Manual, reserving the right to amend said policy to meet the needs of the Board and library staff.

RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE LIBRARY DIRECTOR

The Director shall be charged with the sole administration of the library. The Director shall be responsible to the Board in matters pertaining to and concerning the library, be present at Board meetings and prepare and present reports as requested.

The Director shall maintain monthly financial records in an efficient manner, present monthly reports to the Board, and prepare the annual budget for Board approval. It is recommended that a Board member, along with the Director, should present the library budget to the Village Board for its approval.

The Director shall hold regular meetings with staff and volunteers for training, scheduling, performance review, and interpreting Board policy.

The Director shall have the responsibility for all materials in the library. This includes selection, ordering, processing, discarding, and inventory of the collection according to the guidelines in the Materials Selection Policy.

WAGES, BENEFITS, AND HOURS OF EMPLOYMENT

All wages, benefits, hours of employment will be submitted as part of the budget process and approved by the Library Board prior to submission to the Village Board.

VACATION REQUESTS

The Director will submit requests for vacation time in writing approval by the Board at a regularly scheduled meeting prior to the date of the vacation. As much advance notice as possible is desirable and appreciated.

In case of an emergency, such as a funeral, family illness, etc. may be submitted to a Board Officer with as much advance notice as possible.

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

The Director is encouraged to attend continuing education unit (CEU) events and shall be allowed expenses at the discretion of the Board.

The Director will obtain permission from the Library Board prior to attending any conferences outside of the area. Costs and time away will be factored into the decision

Within four weeks of returning from a CEU event, the Director should complete a brief, written summary that will be shared with staff and the Board. This report is required if the Director wishes to continue to take advantage of CEU opportunities. It is valuable as a record of employee initiative and training and as a tool to inform staff of new ideas and insights.

The Director is encouraged to attend the Wisconsin Library Association annual convention and shall be allowed expenses at the discretion of the Board. Membership in the Wisconsin Library Association is encouraged. The membership fee shall be paid on the Director’s behalf at the discretion of the Board.

Category: Staff & Volunteers

POLICY

Title: Volunteer Services

Effective: June 2005

Revised: July 2009, July 2015, March 2019

Individuals and groups are encouraged to volunteer their time and efforts in the service of the library. In appreciation of volunteer services, the library acknowledges the need to organize volunteer activities and provide for appropriate recognition.

The library shall use the services of volunteers to:

-supplement the effort of paid staff by shelving, tidying our collections, and completing the paging lists.

-serve as a resource for encouraging citizens to become familiar with their library and the services being offered.

-support fund-raising activities sponsored by the library, the Friends of the Shirley M. Wright Memorial Library, or the Library Foundation.

Annual recognition will be given to the library volunteers. Rewards and notes of appreciation will be at the discretion of the Library Director.

All registration and circulation records, formal and informal, are considered to be confidential in nature. (See “Personal Privacy and Confidentiality” p.16). Therefore, only authorized staff may perform any duties that involve patrons directly.

Category: WRLSWEB

POLICY

Title: Shared Information Technology Network (WRLSWEB)

Effective: June 1, 2005

Revised: July 2015

The shared information technology network, known as WRLSWEB, is a cooperative service program of Winding Rivers Library System (WRLS) and La Crosse Public Library (LPL). As a program of WRLS and LPL, the shared automation network is established, administered, operated and maintained under the legal authority of the Board of Trustees of Winding Rivers Library system and La Crosse Public Library.

The WRLSWEB shared information technology network is established to provide a shared, integrated library automation system to WRLS member public libraries. By the action of the Shirley M. Wright Memorial Library Board of Trustees, the Shirley M. Wright Memorial Library is a participating member of WRLSWEB.

As a participating library, we accept the following premises:

+by joining in this sharing effort, the library resources in this region will be more available and valuable.

+the whole of WRLSWEB will be greater than the sum of its parts.

+standardization of some components, procedures and policies will allow WRLSWEB to function more efficiently and effectively for its participants.

+the autonomy waived by adopting these standards is outweighed by the collective benefit represented by the share information technology network.

As a participating library, we agree to uphold the by-laws of the WRLSWEB shared information technology network. (See Appendix E)

APPENDIX“A”

LIBRARY BILL OF RIGHTS

The American Library Association affirms that all libraries are forums for information and ideas, and that the following basic policies should guide their services.

I. Books and other library resources should be provided for the interest, information and enlightenment of all people of the community the library serves. Materials should not be excluded because of the origin, background, or views of those contributing to their creation.

II. Libraries should provide materials and information presenting all points of view on current and historical issues. Material should not be proscribed or removed because of partisan or doctrinal disapproval.

III. Libraries should challenge censorship in the fulfillment of their responsibility to provide information and enlightenment.

IV. Libraries should cooperate with all persons and groups concerned with resisting abridgement of free expression and free access to ideas.

V. A person’s right to use a library should not be denied or abridged because of origin, age, background, or views.

VI. Libraries which make exhibit spaces and meeting rooms available to the public they serve should make such facilities available on an equitable basis, regardless of the beliefs or affiliations of individuals or groups requesting their use.

Adopted June 18, 1948.

Amended February 2, 1961, and January 23, 1980,

Inclusion of “age” reaffirmed January 23, 1996 by the ALA Council

APPENDIX “B”

THE FREEDOM TO READ

The freedom to read is essential to our democracy. It is continuously under attack. Private groups and public authorities in various parts of the country are working to remove or limit access to reading materials, to censor content in schools, to label “controversial” views, to distribute lists of “objectionable” books or authors, and to purge libraries. These actions apparently rise from a view that our national tradition of free expression is no longer valid, that censorship and suppression are needed to avoid the subversion of politics and the corruption of morals. We, as citizens devoted to reading and librarians and publishers responsible for disseminating ideas, wish to assert the public interest in the preservation of the freedom to read.

Most attempts at suppression rest on a denial of the fundamental premise of democracy, that the ordinary citizen, by exercising critical judgment, will accept the good and reject the bad. The censors, public and private, assume that they should determine what is good and is bad for their fellow citizens.

We trust Americans to recognize propaganda and misinformation, and to make their own decisions about what they read and believe. We do not believe they need the help of censors to assist them in this task. We do not believe they are prepared to sacrifice their heritage of a free press in order to be “protected” against what others think may be bad for them. We believe they still favor free enterprise in ideas and expression.

These efforts at suppression are related to a larger pattern of pressures being brought against education, the press, art and images, films, broadcast media and the Internet. The problem is not only one of actual censorship. The shadow of fear cast by these pressures leads, we suspect, to an even larger voluntary curtailment of expression by those who seek to avoid controversy.

Such pressure toward conformity is perhaps natural to a time of accelerated change. And yet suppression is never more dangerous than in such a time of social tension. Freedom has given the United States the elasticity to endure strain. Freedom keeps open the path of novel and creative solutions and enables change to come by choice. Every silencing of a heresy, every enforcement of an orthodoxy, diminishes the toughness and resilience of our society and leaves it the less able to deal with controversy and difference.

Now as always in our history reading is among our greatest freedoms. The freedom to read and write is almost the only means for making generally available ideas or manners of expression that can initially command only a small audience. The written word is the natural medium for the new idea and the untried voice from which come the original contributions to social growth. It is essential to the extended discussion that serious thought requires, and to the accumulation of knowledge and ideas into organized collections.

We believe that free communication is essential to the preservation of a free society and a creative culture. We believe that these pressures toward conformity present the danger of limiting the range and variety of inquiry and expression on which our democracy and our culture depend. We believe that every American community must jealously guard the freedom to publish and to circulate, in order to preserve its own freedom to read. We believe that publishers and librarians have a profound responsibility to give validity to that freedom to read by making it possible for the readers to choose freely from a variety of offerings. The freedom to read is guaranteed by the Constitution. Those with faith in free people will stand firm on these constitutional guarantees of essential rights and will exercise the responsibilities that accompany these rights.

We therefore affirm these propositions.

  1. It is in the public interest for publishers and librarians to make available the widest diversity of views and expression, including those that are unorthodox or unpopular with the majority.

Creative thought is by definition new, and what is new is different. The bearer of every new thought is a rebel until that idea is refined and tested. Totalitarian systems attempt to maintain themselves in power by the ruthless suppression of any concept that challenges the established orthodoxy. The power of a democratic system to adapt to change is vastly strengthened by the freedom of its citizens to choose widely from among conflicting opinions offered freely to them. To stifle every nonconformist idea at birth would mark the end of the democratic process. Furthermore, only through the constant activity of weighing and selecting can the democratic mind attain the strength demanded by times like these. We need to know not only what we believe but why we believe it.

  1. Publishers, librarians, and booksellers do not need to endorse every idea or presentation they make available. It would conflict with the public interest for them to establish their own political, moral, or aesthetic views as a standard for determining what should be published or circulated.

Publishers and librarians serve the educational process by helping to make available knowledge and ideas required for the growth of the mind and the increase of learning. They do not foster education by imposing as mentors the patterns of their own thought. The people should have the freedom to read and consider a broader range of ideas that those that may be held by any single librarian or publisher, or government or church. It is wrong that what one can read should be confined to what another think proper.

  1. It is contrary to the public interest for publishers or librarians to bar access to writings on the basis of the personal history or political affiliations of the author.

No art or literature can flourish if it is to be measured by the political views or private lives of its creators. No society of free people can flourish that draws up lists of writers to whom it will not listen, whatever they may have to say.

  1. There is no place in our society for efforts to coerce the taste of others, to confine adults to the reading matter deemed suitable for adolescents, or to inhibit the efforts of writers to achieve artistic expression.

To some, much of modern expression is shocking. But is not much of life itself shocking? We cut off literature at the source if we prevent writers from dealing with the stuff of life. Parents and teachers have a responsibility to prepare the young to meet the diversity of experiences in life to which they will be exposed, as they have a responsibility to help them learn to think critically for themselves. These are affirmative responsibilities, not to be discharged simply by preventing them from reading works for which they are not yet prepared. In these matters values differ, and values cannot be legislated; nor can machinery be devised that will suit the demands of one group without limiting the freedom of others.

  1. It is not in the public interest to force a reader to accept with any expression the prejudgment of a label characterizing it or its author as subversive or dangerous.

The ideal of labeling presupposes the existence of individuals or groups with wisdom to determine by authority what is good or bad for the citizen. It presupposes that individuals must be directed in making up their minds about the ideas they examine. But Americans do not need others to do their thinking for them.

  1. It is the responsibility of publishers and librarians, as guardians of the people’s freedom to read, to contest encroachments upon that freedom by individuals or groups seeking to impose their own standards or tastes upon the community at large.

It is inevitable in the give and take of the democratic process that the political, the moral, or the aesthetic concepts of an individual or group will occasionally collide with those of another individual or group. In a free society individual are free to determine for themselves what they wish to read, and each group is free to determine what it will recommend to its freely associated members. But no group has the right to take the law into its own hands, and to impose its own concept of politics or morality upon other members of a democratic society. Freedom is no freedom if it is accorded only to the accepted and the inoffensive.

  1. It is the responsibility of publishers and librarians to give full meaning to the freedom to read by providing books that enrich the quality and diversity of thought and expression. By the exercise of this affirmative responsibility, they can demonstrate that the answer to a “bad” book is a good one; the answer to a “bad” idea is a good one.

The freedom to read is of little consequence when the reader cannot obtain matter fit for that reader’s purpose. What is needed is not only the absence of restraint, but the positive provision of opportunity for the people to read the best that has been thought and said. Books are the major channel by which the intellectual inheritance is handed down, and the principal means of its testing and growth. The defense of the freedom to read requires of all publishers and librarians the utmost of their faculties and deserves of all citizens the fullest of their support.

We state these propositions neither lightly nor as easy generalizations. We here stake out a lofty claim for the value of the written word. We do so because we believe that it is possessed of enormous variety and usefulness, worthy of cherishing and keeping free. We realize that the application of these propositions may mean the dissemination of ideas and manners of expression that are repugnant to many persons. We do not state these propositions in the comfortable belief that what people read is unimportant. We believe rather that what people read is deeply important; that ideas can be dangerous; but that the suppression of ideas is fatal to a democratic society. Freedom itself is a dangerous way of life, but it is ours.

This statement was originally issued in May of 1953 by the Westchester Conference of the American Library Association and the American Book Publishers Council, which in 1970 consolidated with the American Educational Publishers Institute to become the Association of American Publishers.

Adopted June 25, 1953; revised January 28, 1972, January 16, 1991, July 12, 2000 by the ALA Council and the AAP Freedom to Read Committee.

A Joint Statement by:

American Library Association

Association of American Publishers

Subsequently Endorsed by:

American Association of University Professors

American Booksellers Foundation for Free Expression

The American Society of Newspaper Editors

Anti-Defamation League of B’nai B’rith

Association of American University Presses

Center for Democracy and Theology

The Children’s Book Council

The Electronic Frontier Foundation

Feminists for Free Expression

Freedom to Read Foundation

International Reading Association

The Media Institute

National Coalition Against Censorship

National PTA

Parents, Families and Friends of Lesbians and Gays

People for the American Way

Student Press Law Center

The Thomas Jefferson Center for the Protection of Free Expression

APPENDIX “C”

SHIRLEY M. WRIGHT MEMORIAL LIBRARY

DISPLAY AND EXHIBIT RELEASE FORM

*Acceptance of any items to be displayed at the library is under the discretion of the Library Director.

I, the undersigned, hereby lend the following works of art or other material to the Shirley M. Wright Memorial Library for exhibit purposes only. In consideration of the privilege of exhibiting them in the library, I hereby release said library from responsibility for loss, damage, or destruction while they are in the possession of the library.

Dates of Exhibition: __

Description of Materials Loaned





Signature of Owner: __

Address: ___

Telephone Number: _____

Date: ____

APPENDIX “D”

Shirley M. Wright Memorial Library

Statement of Concern about Library Resources

Name__Date_____

Address____Phone____

City__State__ZIP

Resource on which you are commenting:

Book Audio-Book

Magazine Videocassette / DVD

Newspaper Music CD

Title: _____

Author / Publisher / Producer / Date_____

  1. What brought the resource to your attention?

  2. To what do you object? Please be as specific as possible.

  3. Have you read or listened or viewed the entire content? If not, what parts?

  4. What do you feel the effect of the material might be?

  5. For what age group would you recommend this material?

  6. In its place, what material of equal or better quality would you recommend?

  7. What do you want the library to do with this material?

  8. Additional Comments?

APPENDIX ‘E’

SHIRLEY M. WRIGHT MEMORIAL LIBRARY

Statement of Concern about Library Policy / Programming

Name__Date__

Address____Phone_____

City__State_Zip Code___

Your concern is about (please check)

_____Library Policy

_____Library-initiated Program

_____Non-initiated Library Program

What is your concern about this policy or program?

Please tell us all you can to help us understand your concerns:

Library Policies